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RLS Week 1: Locust Peak Pose

Lesson Plan Duration:

60

yoga pose
Ankle Bending
yoga pose
Ankle Rotation
yoga pose
Toe Bending
yoga pose
Ankle Crank
yoga pose
Knee Bending
yoga pose
Knee Crank
yoga pose
Start Of Sequence
yoga pose
Knee To Chest
yoga pose
Eye Of The Needle
yoga pose
Sacral Circles
yoga pose
Knees To Head
yoga pose
Supine Leg Raise
yoga pose
Raised Legs
yoga pose
Reclined Hand To Big Toe A Prep
yoga pose
Rocking And Rolling Squats
yoga pose
Bridge
yoga pose
Bridge Ankle On Knee
yoga pose
Start Of Sequence
yoga pose
Cow
yoga pose
Cow Leg Raise
yoga pose
Cow Arm Leg Raises
yoga pose
Crocodile
yoga pose
Half Bow
yoga pose
Locust
yoga pose
Start Of Sequence
yoga pose
Standing Quad Stretch
yoga pose
Tree
yoga pose
Chair
yoga pose
Chair Elevated
yoga pose
Goddess Anjali Mudra
yoga pose
Goddess Twist
yoga pose
Squat
yoga pose
Squat On Tiptoes
yoga pose
Squat Jumps
yoga pose
Squat Leg Extended
yoga pose
Side Lunge Anjali Mudra
yoga pose
Crescent Moon
yoga pose
Cat
yoga pose
Child
yoga pose
Start Of Sequence
yoga pose
Crocodile Side Turn

Q&A

What are some of the triggers for RLS?

Being Still For Too Long – Sitting at your work desk, long car trips or flights, and sitting watching a movie can all set off symptoms. Try to take breaks from sitting every 15 to 20 minutes, so you’re not still for too long.

Alcohol – If you find that your RLS symptoms are worse when drinking alcohol, avoid it, especially close to bedtime.

Stress – RLS symptoms can increase when stressed. That’s why yoga is so highly recommended.

Medication – Your prescription or non-prescription drugs can make your RLS symptoms worse. Never stop taking a prescription drug without talking to your doctor first. If you notice that your symptoms get worse while on medication, talk to your doctor about switching drugs or dosages.

Lack Of Sleep – Sometimes RLS can get worse if you go to sleep later or get up earlier than usual. Stick to a regular bedtime routine.

Caffeine – Limit the amount of coffee, coca cola, or tea you drink particularly close to bedtime.

Chocolate – Limit the amount of chocolate you eat particularly close to bedtime.

Energy Drinks – Limit the amount of energy drinks you consume.

Smoking – If you find smoking makes your RLS symptoms worse, quit.

Hard Exercise – Moderate exercise may help ease your symptoms. But if you exercise too hard it may make your symptoms worse.

Temperature – Avoid extreme weather. Hot weather can make RLS worse for some people, while others might be affected by the cold. Get temporary relief from a hot bath, cold shower, ice packs, or heating pads.

Refined Sugar – Avoid processed foods and sweetened drinks.

Clothing – Avoid tight clothing, especially pyjamas.

How can I ease RLS? 

Lunch Time Is Park Time  – Take your lunch with you for a walk to the park. Walking in nature is ideal because it’s also one of the best ways to reduce anxiety and increase well-being. If, however, there’s no park, walk up and down the office stairs or around the block.

Circulation Boost – Every 20 or 30 minutes get up from your seat and do a standing yoga pose (e.g. mountain, warrior, lunge, squat) for a few minutes. Sitting for longer than 30 minutes at a time will make your RLS worse. Even if you don’t have RLS, sitting for longer than 30 minutes is bad news for the back and your energy levels.

Daily Leg Stretch –  If you’re serious about easing your RLS symptoms, you absolutely must start and end your day by stretching your legs. And during the day remember to get up from your seat to stretch them.

Driving Long Distances –  If you’re a passenger in a car and you’re going for a long drive, have the courage to ask to pull over every 30 to 45 minutes. The driver won’t mind when they know about your RLS.

Leg Massage – Massage your own legs with massage oil, especially when your legs are cold. And get professional massages on a regular basis. Explain to the masseuse that you have RLS and they will give you a gentle massage.

Flying – Request an aisle seat when you fly. That will allow you to give your circulation a boost by getting up frequently.

Energy Slump – Its natural during the day to have energy slumps. When it happens fight the urge to drink caffeine (coffee or tea). That will make your RLS symptoms worse. Instead of the caffeine, get up from your chair and do 60 seconds of leg stretching.

Hot Bath Or Ice Packs – Hot baths relaxes body and soul -- and for some it soothes RLS symptoms. Chilling out with ice packs can also help.

No Bottoms Up – Stop drinking alcohol. If you’ve got RLS, alcohol will almost certainly cause RLS symptoms to worsen.

Take It Easy –  Moderate workouts can relieve RLS symptoms, but excessive exercise may cause them to worsen.

What are the two forms of RLS? 

Primary or idiopathic RLS - has no known cause and usually begins slowly, before approximately 40–45 years of age. It is often genetically linked and it is likely that another family member may also share the condition. Primary RLS can come and go, sometimes for months on end, and is often progressive, meaning it gets worse with age.

Secondary RLS - often has a sudden onset and is usually associated with another medical condition (e.g. iron deficiency anemia) or the use of certain drugs. Some medications, such as the antihistamines in cold and allergy remedies, make the symptoms worse for some people (so while Benadryl tends to make most people sleepy, for example, it may actually intensify the symptoms in a person with RLS, making it harder for them to sleep.)

When does RLS start?

RLS may start at any age, including childhood, and is a progressive disease for some, while the symptoms may remit in others. It affects men and women, young and old, although it is most commonly seen in women over the age of 40. Symptoms will gradually worsen over time in about two thirds of people with the condition and may be severe enough to be disabling.

Am I more likely to have RLS during pregnancy? 

About one in five pregnant women also develop the condition, usually in the third trimester and often continue to experience symptoms after childbirth. In children, RLS is often wrongly identified as 'growing pains'.

Can RLS be treated successfully? 

RLS is often unrecognised or misdiagnosed but there is a growing awareness of the condition amongst medical practitioners. In many people, the condition is not diagnosed until 10-20 years after symptoms begin. However, once correctly diagnosed, RLS can often be treated successfully.

Is there a cure for RLS? 

Doctors don't know the cause of RLS, and there’s no cure. But certain things can trigger symptoms. Knowing your triggers and how to avoid them will help.

What poses do you recommend for RLS?

Poses such as squats, warrior, tree and ankle rotations help ease the symptoms of RLS because they stretch the calves, thighs, hips and ankles.

Ankle Rotations On A Chair: Sit on the edge of a chair, resting both feet on the ground. Lift your right foot 3 inches off the ground and point your toes. Leading with your toes, form a circle toward your right, keeping the rest of your leg still. Do 10-15 circles, then switch direction and do 10-15 more circles. Repeat with your left foot.

Seated Calf Stretch: Do this stretch in bed to help relieve RLS cramping and discomfort that can keep you awake. Sitting in bed, straighten your right leg and flex your right foot toward you, clasping your hands around your toes. Pull your toes toward you and hold for 20-30 seconds. Repeat with the opposite leg. If you can’t reach your toes, wrap a towel around them and pull the ends toward you until you feel a stretch in your calves.

Is it okay to hold poses for long periods if I have RLS? 

Avoid staying too long in poses that load the legs such as lunge, warrior I, II, III, tree.

Should I stretch my leg muscles when I get up from sitting? 

Yes.

Is swimming good for RLS?

If your local swimming pool isn't very busy do Yoga in the pool. It's a great way to reduce the pain of RLS because the water takes the weight off your legs and feet.

Should I stretch in the evenings? 

The beneficial effects of stretching may only last a few hours, so stretch in the early evening to help relieve symptoms before bedtime.

Should I go to bed later? 

It's common in RLS to wake in the morning, only for your body wanting to go to sleep. You think you’ve slept but you’ve only had superficial sleep, not the deep sleep you need to achieve sleep refreshment. You wake up fatigued. RLS seems to affect the first part of the night for many people. A simple solution is to go to bed later and sleep a little longer in the morning.