10 Yoga Philosophy Lesson Plan Ideas: From 8 Limbs Of Yoga to the 7 Chakras

 

Greetings, my lovely Yogis, Yoginis, and Yoga teachers. I’m George Watts, a BWY yoga teacher and creator of the online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner.

As a yoga teacher, you know that yoga is much more than just a physical practice. It is a holistic approach to health and well-being that includes mental, emotional, and spiritual elements.

One of the fundamental aspects of yoga is its philosophy, which provides a framework for understanding the nature of reality, the human condition, and the purpose of life.

However, teaching yoga philosophy can be challenging, especially if you want to make it engaging and accessible to your students.

In this blog post, we will share ten creative yoga philosophy lesson plan ideas that will help you bring this essential aspect of yoga to life in your classes.

Let’s begin with what the eight limbs of Yoga are.

 

THE 8 LIMBS OF YOGA

 

What are the eight limbs of Yoga?

The Eight Limbs of Yoga are a set of guidelines or practices for living a meaningful and purposeful life, as outlined in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a foundational text of yoga philosophy.

The Eight Limbs provide a comprehensive framework for spiritual growth and self-realization, guiding practitioners towards a state of inner peace, contentment, and unity with the divine.

The Eight Limbs of Yoga are:

  1. Yama – ethical principles or restraints, including non-violence, truthfulness, non-stealing, continence, and non-greed.
  2. Niyama – personal observances or disciplines, including cleanliness, contentment, self-discipline, self-study, and surrender to a higher power.
  3. Asana – physical postures practised with mindfulness and awareness to prepare the body and mind for meditation and higher consciousness.
  4. Pranayama – breathing techniques that cultivate prana or life force energy, purify the body and mind and enhance the practice of meditation.
  5. Pratyahara – withdrawal of the senses from external distractions, allowing the practitioner to turn their attention inward and focus on the inner realm.
  6. Dharana – concentration or one-pointed focus, where the practitioner trains the mind to remain fixed on a single object or point of awareness.
  7. Dhyana – meditation or the sustained flow of awareness towards the chosen object of meditation, leading to a deep state of inner stillness and peace.
  8. Samadhi – union with the divine, where the practitioner experiences a state of oneness and integration with all that is.

The Eight Limbs of Yoga provide a comprehensive path towards spiritual growth and self-realization, encompassing all aspects of the human experience – physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual.

By practising these limbs with dedication and sincerity, one can cultivate a life of meaning, purpose, and fulfilment, and ultimately attain the ultimate goal of yoga – union with the divine.

Next up, here’s a visualization exercise to help you remember the eight limbs of Yoga.

Eight Limbs Of Yoga Visualization

Here’s a visualization exercise that can help you remember what Eight Limbs of Yoga is:

Find a comfortable and quiet place where you can sit or lie down without being disturbed. Take a few deep breaths to relax your body and calm your mind.

Imagine yourself standing at the bottom of a mountain. This mountain represents the Eight Limbs of Yoga.

You can see the peak of the mountain far above you, and you know that you have to climb it to reach the summit. The climb will be long and challenging, but you are determined to reach the top.

As you start climbing, you come across a signpost that says “Yama” – the first limb of yoga. You pause for a moment to reflect on the five ethical principles that form the foundation of Yama – non-violence, truthfulness, non-stealing, continence, and non-greed.

You continue climbing, and you come across another signpost that says “Niyama” – the second limb of yoga. You take a moment to reflect on the five personal observances or disciplines of Niyama – cleanliness, contentment, self-discipline, self-study, and surrender to a higher power.

You keep climbing, and you come across a third signpost that says “Asana” – the third limb of yoga. You pause for a moment to reflect on the physical postures practised with mindfulness and awareness to prepare the body and mind for meditation and higher consciousness.

You keep climbing, and you come across a fourth signpost that says “Pranayama” – the fourth limb of yoga. You take a moment to reflect on the breathing techniques that cultivate prana or life force energy, purify the body and mind, and enhance the practice of meditation.

You keep climbing, and you come across a fifth signpost that says “Pratyahara” – the fifth limb of yoga. You pause for a moment to reflect on the withdrawal of the senses from external distractions, allowing the practitioner to turn their attention inward and focus on the inner realm.

You keep climbing, and you come across a sixth signpost that says “Dharana” – the sixth limb of yoga. You take a moment to reflect on the concentration or one-pointed focus, where the practitioner trains the mind to remain fixed on a single object or point of awareness.

You keep climbing, and you come across a seventh signpost that says “Dhyana” – the seventh limb of yoga. You pause for a moment to reflect on the sustained flow of awareness towards the chosen object of meditation, leading to a deep state of inner stillness and peace.

Finally, you reach the summit of the mountain, where you come across the eighth and final signpost that says “Samadhi” – the ultimate goal of yoga. You take a moment to reflect on the union with the divine, where the practitioner experiences a state of oneness and integration with all that is.

Take a few deep breaths and visualize yourself standing at the summit of the mountain, feeling a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment. When you’re ready, slowly open your eyes and bring your attention back to the present moment.

By visualizing the Eight Limbs of Yoga as a mountain to climb, you can remember each limb more easily and connect with the deeper meaning and significance of each practice.

Next up, are ten eight limbs of Yoga class theme ideas.

10 Eight Limbs Of Yoga Class Theme Ideas

Here are 10 possible Eight Limbs of Yoga class themes:

  1. Ahimsa: Exploring Non-Violence in Our Practice and Daily Lives
  2. Santosha: Cultivating Contentment and Gratitude on and off the Mat
  3. Asteya: Honouring Abundance and Letting Go of Scarcity Mindset
  4. Svadhyaya: Practicing Self-Reflection and Self-Study
  5. Pranayama: Deepening Our Breath Awareness and Vitality
  6. Dharana and Dhyana: Developing Concentration and Mindfulness Meditation Practices
  7. Samadhi: Connecting with the Divine and Accessing Higher States of Consciousness
  8. Yamas and Niyamas: Living the Ethics and Observances of Yoga
  9. Pratyahara: Finding Balance and Harmony by Withdrawing Senses
  10. Asana and the Eight Limbs: Integrating Yoga Philosophy into Our Physical Practice.

Next up, is an Eight Limbs Of Yoga class plan that you can use.

Eight Limbs Of Yoga Class Plan

Here is an Eight Limbs Of Yoga Class plan.

Class Theme: Exploring the Eight Limbs of Yoga

Class Duration: 60-75 minutes

Props: Yoga mats, blocks, straps, and blankets (optional)

Class Sequence:

  1. Centering (5 minutes): Begin the class by inviting students to sit comfortably in a cross-legged position with their eyes closed. Ask them to take a few deep breaths (e.g. Abdominal Breath) to calm their minds and connect with their bodies. Invite them to set an intention for their practice, such as exploring the Eight Limbs of Yoga.
  2. Warm-up (10-15 minutes): Start with gentle warm-up poses, such as Cat-Cow pose, Sun Salutations, and standing forward bends. Encourage students to focus on their breath and move mindfully, bringing their attention to the present moment.
  3. Yama and Niyama (10-15 minutes): Introduce the first two limbs of yoga, Yama and Niyama, and discuss the five ethical principles and personal observances. Invite students to reflect on how they can apply these principles in their daily lives. Offer a few poses that embody these principles, such as Tree pose (for non-violence), Triangle Pose (for truthfulness), and Warrior II Pose (for self-discipline). Side Note: The Triangle pose can be a pose to practice truthfulness because it helps to align the body in a way that opens the heart and throat chakras, which are associated with communication, self-expression, and honesty.
  4. Asana (20-25 minutes): Guide students through a sequence of yoga poses practised with mindfulness and awareness. Encourage them to focus on alignment, breath, and sensation, and invite them to explore variations and modifications as needed. Offer standing poses such as Downward-Facing Dog, Warrior IWarrior II, and Warrior III.
  5. Pranayama and Pratyahara (10-15 minutes): Introduce the fourth and fifth limbs of yoga, Pranayama and Pratyahara, and discuss the importance of breathing techniques and sense withdrawal. Guide students through a few simple breathing exercises, such as Nadi Shodhana (Alternate Nostril Breathing), and invite them to practice sense withdrawal by closing their eyes and focusing on their breath.
  6. Dharana and Dhyana (10-15 minutes): Introduce the sixth and seventh limbs of yoga, Dharana and Dhyana, and discuss the practice of concentration and meditation. Guide students through simple meditation practice, such as Empty Cup Meditation or focusing on a single object. Encourage them to let go of distractions and cultivate a sense of inner stillness.
  7. Samadhi (5-10 minutes): Introduce the final limb of yoga, Samadhi, and discuss the goal of union with the divine. Invite students to lie down in Savasana and visualize themselves in a state of oneness and integration with all that is. Play soft music or offer guided relaxation, such as Blue Bubble Relaxation as they rest in this final pose.
  8. Closing (5 minutes): Invite students to slowly come out of Savasana and sit comfortably in a cross-legged position (Easy pose). Offer a few final words of encouragement and gratitude, and invite them to take their practice off the mat and into their daily lives.

This yoga class plan provides a fun, crash course to exploring the Eight Limbs of Yoga. By adding all aspects of the Eight Limbs, students can deepen their understanding of yoga philosophy and experience the transformative power of yoga in their lives.

To flesh this plan out in full, use the online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner, or you can copy and edit any of the 10,000 yoga lesson plans created by 1000+ yoga teachers.

Next up, let’s discuss what Purusha is in Yogic philosophy.

 

PURUSHA

 

What is Purusha?

In Hindu philosophy, Purusha is a Sanskrit term that refers to the pure consciousness or spirit that pervades the universe. It is the divine essence that exists within all living beings and is often described as unchanging and eternal.

In the context of yoga, Purusha refers to the individual’s innermost self or soul. It is the part of ourselves that is unchanging and eternal, beyond our physical body, thoughts, and emotions. The goal of yoga practice is to connect with this innermost self and realize our true nature as Purusha.

Purusha Yoga is a style of yoga that emphasizes the individual’s journey towards self-realization and spiritual growth. It combines physical postures (asanas), breathwork (pranayama), meditation, and philosophical teachings to help practitioners connect with their innermost selves and cultivate a deeper understanding of the nature of existence.

In summary, Purusha is the pure consciousness or divine essence that pervades the universe, and Purusha Yoga is a style of yoga that aims to help practitioners connect with their innermost selves and realize their true nature as Purusha.

Next up, a visualisation exercise to help you remember the meaning of Purusha.

Purusha Visualization

Here’s a visualization exercise that can help you remember what Purusha is:

Imagine yourself standing on a mountaintop, surrounded by vast, open space. As you look out into the distance, you notice a brilliant light that seems to radiate from the very centre of the universe. This light represents Purusha, the divine essence that exists within all living beings.

As you focus on this light, you begin to feel a sense of peace and clarity wash over you. You realize that this light is the source of all existence and that it exists within you as well. It is the essence of your innermost self, the soul that connects you to the universe and all of its living beings.

You breathe deeply, feeling a sense of calm and serenity that emanates from the light. You know that no matter where you go or what you do, this light will always be with you, guiding and supporting you on your journey.

As you continue to gaze at the light, you feel a sense of gratitude and wonder at the vastness and beauty of the universe. You know that you are a part of something much greater than yourself and that Purusha is the key to understanding the true nature of existence.

By visualizing this radiant light and connecting it with the concept of Purusha, you can better remember and understand the divine essence that exists within all living beings.

Next up, are ten Purusha yoga class theme ideas.

10 Purusha Yoga Class Theme Ideas

Here are 10 possible Purusha Yoga class themes:

  1. Finding inner peace through meditation
  2. Connecting with nature through yoga
  3. Celebrating the present moment through mindfulness
  4. Focusing on heart-opening poses for compassion
  5. Cultivating strength and balance through standing poses
  6. Exploring different variations of sun salutations
  7. Practising yoga as a form of self-expression and creativity
  8. Embracing stillness through restorative yoga
  9. Cultivating gratitude and positivity through Yin Yoga and meditation.
  10. Focusing on the present moment through mindful movement and breathwork

Next up, is my Purusha Yoga class plan.

Purusha Yoga Class Plan

Here is a Purusha Yoga Class plan (taken from number 4 on the list above).

Class Title: Purusha: Focusing on Heart-opening Poses for Compassion

Class Description: In this class, we will focus on heart-opening poses to cultivate compassion and connect with the energy of Purusha. Through asana, pranayama, and meditation, we will tap into the love and wisdom within us and radiate it out to others.

Opening Meditation: Begin the class with a short meditation to centre the mind and connect with the breath. Invite students to bring their attention to the heart centre and visualize a bright light glowing within.

Pranayama Practice: Guide students through a pranayama practice that emphasizes deep, slow breathing and emphasizes the connection between the breath and the heart. Use the Heart Chakra breath, where students visualize the breath entering and exiting through the heart centre.

Asana Practice: Incorporate a variety of heart-opening poses, such as the Cobra pose, Camel pose, and Wheel pose. Emphasize the importance of maintaining proper alignment and using the breath to deepen the pose. Encourage students to feel the energy of love and compassion radiating from the heart centre.

Meditation Practice: Lead students through a guided meditation that focuses on cultivating compassion and connecting with the energy of Purusha. Use visualizations that encourage students to open their hearts to themselves, their loved ones, and all living beings. Encourage them to let go of any negative emotions or judgments and to tap into the wisdom and love within them.

Closing: End the class with a few gentle stretches and a moment of gratitude for the practice. During Savasana at the very end of the class, remind students to carry the sense of compassion and love they have cultivated with them throughout their day and to radiate it out to the world.

To flesh this plan out in full, use the online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner, or you can copy and edit any of the 10,000 yoga lesson plans created by 1000+ yoga teachers.

Next up, let’s delve into Prakrti.

 

PRAKRTI

 

What is Prakrti?

Prakrti is a Sanskrit term that refers to the natural world or the material universe. In Hindu philosophy, it is the term used to describe the material cause of the universe.

Prakrti is made up of three Gunas, or qualities: sattva (purity), rajas (passion), and tamas (darkness). These Gunas interact with each other to create the diversity of the natural world, including all living and non-living things.

In yoga, the practice of connecting with Prakrti is a way to cultivate a deeper understanding and appreciation of the natural world and to harmonize our own energies with the energies of the universe.

Next up, a visualization exercise to help you remember the meaning of Prakrti.

Prakrti Visualization Exercise

Here’s a visualization exercise that can help you remember what Prakrti is:

Begin by finding a quiet and comfortable place where you can sit or lie down without being disturbed. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths to relax your body and mind.

Visualize yourself standing in a beautiful natural setting, such as a forest, a mountain, or a beach. Notice the colours, textures, and sounds around you.

As you breathe in, imagine that you are inhaling the essence of nature – the fresh air, the scent of flowers, and the sound of birds. As you exhale, visualize the three Gunas of Prakrti – sattva, rajas, and tamas – as colours or shapes. Sattva may appear as a clear, bright light, rajas as swirling energy, and tamas as a heavy, dark substance.

Take a moment to observe the interplay between these Gunas. Notice how they blend together to create the natural world around you.

Now, visualize yourself as a part of this natural world. Imagine that you are made up of the same three Gunas as Prakrti and that they are flowing through you in the same way they flow through the natural world.

Take a few more deep breaths, and when you feel ready, slowly open your eyes. With practice, this visualization exercise can help you connect with the essence of Prakrti and cultivate a deeper appreciation for the natural world around you.

Next up, ten Prakrti Yoga class themes for you to mull over.

10 Prakrti Yoga Class Themes

  1. Embracing Change: Explore the nature of impermanence and the importance of adapting to change.
  2. Finding Balance: Examine the balance between the elements and how we can bring balance into our lives.
  3. Honouring the Earth: Connect with the Earth element and our role in protecting the environment.
  4. Letting Go: Let go of attachments and invite release in order to find inner peace.
  5. The Power of Prakriti: Explore the breath as a powerful tool for connecting with Prakrti and cultivating inner peace.
  6. Nature as Teacher: Look to the natural world as a teacher, and learn from the rhythms and cycles of the elements.
  7. Finding Stillness: Explore the power of stillness and connect with the stillness of nature.
  8. Cultivating Awareness: Practice mindfulness and cultivate a deeper awareness of the elements in our lives.
  9. Connecting with the Elements: Connect with each of the five elements through asana, pranayama, and meditation.
  10. Harmony and Flow: Explore the balance between the elements and the importance of living in harmony with Prakrti.

Next up, is my Prakrti Yoga class plan.

Prakrti Yoga Class Plan

Here is a Prakrti Yoga Class plan (taken from number 5 on the list above).

Class Title: The Power of Prakriti: Explore the breath as a powerful tool for connecting with Prakrti and cultivating inner peace

Class Description: In this class, we will explore the breath as a powerful tool for connecting with Prakrti and cultivating inner peace. Through pranayama and asana practices, we will balance the three Gunas of sattva, rajas, and tamas, and tap into the healing power of nature within us.

Opening Meditation: Begin the class with a short meditation to bring awareness to the breath and set an intention for the practice. Encourage students to focus on the sensation of the breath moving in and out of the body, and to observe any thoughts or emotions that arise without judgment.

Pranayama Practice: Guide students through a pranayama practice that emphasizes deep, slow breathing, such as Nadi Shodhana or Ujjayi. Explain how this type of breathing can help balance the Gunas and create a sense of calm and relaxation.

Asana Practice: Add a variety of asanas that connect students with the natural world, such as the Tree pose, Mountain pose, and asana with animal names such as Downward-Facing Dog. Encourage students to feel the energy of the earth beneath their feet, the strength of a mountain (in Mountain pose), and the flow of their breath like a river.

Closing Meditation: End the class with a guided meditation that brings students back to their breath and their intention for the practice. Encourage them to visualize themselves as part of the natural world, connected to the energy of Prakrti and the three Gunas. Finish with a few deep breaths and a moment of silence.

Closing: Thank the students for their practice and remind them to carry the sense of connection and inner peace they have cultivated with them throughout their day.

To flesh this plan out in full, use the online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner, or you can copy and edit any of the 10,000 yoga lesson plans created by 1000+ yoga teachers.

Next up, are the Yoga Sutras

 

THE YOGA SUTRAS

 

What are the Yoga Sutras?

The Yoga Sutras are a collection of ancient texts that serve as the foundational text of classical yoga philosophy. They were compiled by the sage Patanjali, who is believed to have lived in ancient India sometime between 200 BCE and 500 CE.

The Yoga Sutras consist of 196 aphorisms, or short statements, that outlines a comprehensive system of yoga philosophy and practice. They are organized into four chapters each of which covers a different aspect of yoga:

  1. Samadhi Pada: This chapter discusses the nature of yoga, the obstacles that can arise on the path, and the practices that can help overcome those obstacles.
  2. Sadhana Pada: This chapter outlines the various practices of yoga, including asana (postures), pranayama (breath control), and meditation.
  3. Vibhuti Pada: This chapter explores the various powers and abilities that can be developed through yoga practice, such as concentration, intuition, and psychic powers.
  4. Kaivalya Pada: This chapter describes the ultimate goal of yoga, which is to attain liberation (kaivalya) from the cycle of birth and death and to experience the true nature of the Self.

The Yoga Sutras are considered to be one of the most important texts in the yoga tradition and have had a profound influence on the development of yoga philosophy and practice over the centuries. They provide a comprehensive guide to the practice of yoga, including both the physical and spiritual dimensions, and offer insights into the nature of consciousness, the human mind, and the ultimate reality of the universe.

Yoga Sutras “Ahimsa” Visualization Exercise

Here’s a visualization exercise for the concept of “ahimsa” (non-violence), which is one of the key principles of the Yoga Sutras:

  1. Begin by finding a quiet and comfortable place to sit or lie down. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths to relax your body and calm your mind.
  2. Visualize yourself standing in the middle of a vast, peaceful forest. The air is fresh and clean, and the trees are tall and green.
  3. As you walk through the forest, you come across a small bird sitting on a branch. The bird chirps happily as you approach, and you feel a sense of joy and contentment.
  4. As you continue on your walk, you come across a spider’s web stretched across your path. You stop to admire the intricate web and the delicate spider weaving it. You notice how the spider moves with grace and precision, careful not to disturb the web.
  5. As you walk further, you come across a group of animals grazing peacefully in a meadow. You watch as they interact with each other, noticing how they coexist in harmony and without aggression.
  6. As you reflect on the peacefulness of the forest and the animals, you remember the concept of ahimsa. You consider how this principle applies not only to our interactions with other beings but also to the thoughts and actions we have towards ourselves.
  7. Take a few moments to silently repeat the word “ahimsa” to yourself, feeling a sense of compassion and non-violence in your heart.
  8. When you’re ready, take a deep breath and slowly open your eyes. Take a moment to reflect on the visualization and how the principle of ahimsa can inform your thoughts and actions in your daily life.

Yoga Sutras Memory Palace Exercise

A memory champion would likely use a technique called the “memory palace” to remember the Yoga Sutras.

Here’s how they might do it:

  1. Memory Palace: First, the memory champion would create a mental image of a familiar place, such as their childhood home or a favourite park. This place will serve as their “memory palace.”
  2. Key Locations: Next, they would identify key locations within their memory palace that they can use to store information. For example, they might use the front door as a location for the first chapter of the Yoga Sutras, Samadhi Pada.
  3. Mental Image: To remember the individual aphorisms within Samadhi Pada, the memory champion would create a mental image that represents each concept. For example, they might imagine a book as a symbol for the first aphorism, “Now, the teachings of yoga.”
  4. Location: They would then place each mental image at the appropriate location within their memory palace. For example, they would place the mental image of the book at the front door of their memory palace to represent the first aphorism of Samadhi Pada.
  5. Recall: As they move through their memory palace, the memory champion would mentally “see” each mental image at the corresponding location, allowing them to recall the information they need.
  6. Multiple Locations: To remember the subsequent chapters, Sadhana Pada, Vibhuti Pada, and Kaivalya Pada, the memory champion would assign different locations within their memory palace for each chapter, and repeat the process of creating mental images to represent each aphorism within each chapter.

By using this memory champion technique, you can effectively “store” the information they need in a familiar and structured way, making it easier to recall the Yoga Sutras when needed. With practice, you can quickly and easily navigate your memory palace to retrieve any information you need, including the aphorisms of the Yoga Sutras.

Next up, ten Yoga Sutras class themes for you to mull over.

10 Yoga Sutras Class Themes

here are ten Yoga Sutra class theme ideas:

  1. The Eight Limbs of Yoga: Exploring the foundational principles of Yoga outlined in the Yoga Sutras.

  2. Sutra 1.2: “Yogas Citta Vrtti Nirodha”: Understanding the meaning and significance of this key sutra, which outlines the goal of yoga as the cessation of the fluctuations of the mind.

  3. Ahimsa: Practicing non-violence in our thoughts, words, and actions, both towards ourselves and others, as outlined in Sutra 2.35.

  4. Pranayama: Exploring breathwork as a powerful tool for calming the mind and cultivating inner peace, as described in Sutra 2.49.

  5. Dharana: Practicing concentration and focus as a means of cultivating mindfulness and inner awareness, as outlined in Sutra 3.1.

  6. Samadhi: Exploring the state of samadhi, or complete absorption in the present moment, as described in Sutra 1.17.

  7. Svadhyaya: Practicing self-study and self-reflection as a means of gaining insight into our true nature, as described in Sutra 2.44.

  8. Ishvara Pranidhana: Surrendering to universal consciousness, as a means of letting go of attachment and cultivating inner peace, as described in Sutra 1.23.

  9. Sthira Sukham Asanam: Finding a balance between effort and ease in our physical practice, as described in Sutra 2.46.

  10. Vairagya: Practicing non-attachment and letting go of our desires and aversions, as described in Sutra 1.15.

Next up, is my Prakrti Yoga class plan.

Samadhi Yoga Class Plan

Here is a Samadhi-themed Yoga Class plan (taken from number 6 on the list above): 

Class Title: Cultivate Samadhi: Complete Absorption In The Present Moment

Class Aim: To cultivate the state of Samadhi, or complete absorption in the present moment, through a focused and meditative yoga practice.

Centering (5 minutes): Begin the class by inviting students to find a comfortable seated position and take a few deep breaths. Encourage them to let go of any distractions or concerns and bring their attention fully to the present moment.

Warm-up (10 minutes): Lead the class through a series of gentle warm-up poses, such as Cat-Cow, Downward-Facing Dog, and Sun Salutations. Encourage students to move slowly and mindfully, focusing on their breath and the sensations in their bodies.

Standing poses (20 minutes): Transition into a series of standing poses, such as Warrior II, Triangle Pose, and Half Moon Pose. Encourage students to cultivate a sense of steadiness and focus in each pose, and to use their breath to anchor themselves in the present moment.

Meditation (10 minutes): Lead the class through this Body Sensation themed guided meditation, focusing on the breath and the sensations in the body. Encourage students to let go of any thoughts or distractions and simply be present with their experience.

Savasana (10 minutes): Finish the class with a relaxing Savasana, encouraging students to let go of any tension or stress and fully surrender to the present moment. You may choose to guide students through visualization or simply let them rest in silence.

Closing (5 minutes): Gently bring students out of Savasana and back to a seated position. Invite them to take a few deep breaths and bring their attention back to the present moment. End the class with a word of gratitude and a reminder to carry the sense of Samadhi they cultivated in the class into their daily lives.

Next up, is my conclusion.

 

George’s Conclusion

George's Conclusion

 

So, there you have it Yogis and Yoginis, my Yoga philosophy class themes.

The next time you want to do a Yoga lesson plan and you want to have a yoga philosophy theme, use this post as a guide. Then, when you’ve picked one of the ideas, use the online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner to save time creating the plan. 

Oh yes, I almost forgot.

My free Yoga Pose Directory has over 3000 yoga poses to choose from, so if you’re on the hunt for the perfect poses to include in your lesson plan, you’re in luck! Browse through the directory and find the perfect pose. With so many poses to choose from, you’ll never run out of options.

If you like creating yoga class themes, you’ll want to look at my blog post 101 Perfect Poses For A Peak Pose-Themed Yoga Lesson Plan, and this one: The Power Of Love: Lessons From The Still-face Experiment.

And if you want to streamline your yoga lesson planning process and check out my online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner.

And hey, while you’re here, you might as well get your hands on 37 of my free Yoga lesson plans.

 

Get Your Yogic Hands On 37 Of My Free Yoga Lesson Plans

Below are 37 free downloadable yoga lesson plans that I’ve created for my own yoga classes using the Online Yoga Genie Lesson Planner. Feel free to use them for your own yoga classes, or as inspiration to come up with your own yoga class themes.

Become A Peaceful Warrior Yoga Lesson Plan

Caterpillar To Butterfly Yoga Lesson Plan

How Heavy Is This Glass Of Water Yoga Lesson Plan

Surrender To Slowness Yoga Lesson Plan

You Don’t Need Permission To Shine: Just Show Up, Shine & Be Yourself

Abiciously Delicious Core Yoga Lesson Plan

Chair Yoga Lesson Plan I 

Chair Yoga Lesson Plan II

Chair Yoga For Seniors Lesson Plan

Dolphin Yoga Lesson Plan

Sun Moon Yoga Lesson Plan

Sun Salutations Chair Yoga Lesson Plan

Sun Salutations A Yoga Lesson Plan

Sun Salutations B Yoga Lesson Plan

Sun Salutations C Yoga Lesson Plan

Camel Peak Pose Yoga Lesson Plan

Downward Facing Dog Pose Variations Lesson Plan

Plank Peak Pose Yoga Lesson Plan

Revolved Poses Yoga Lesson Plan

Twists-Themed Yoga Lesson Plan: 41 Twist Poses To Whip Your Student’s Cores Into Shape

Valentines Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga for Cyclists Lesson Plan

Yoga for Swimmers Lesson Plan

Yoga For Seniors Lesson Plan

Hatha Yoga Lesson Plan

Kundalini Yoga Lesson Plan

Pregnancy Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Therapy: Arthritic Spine Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Therapy: Asthma Yoga Lesson Plan 

Yoga Therapy: Hips Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Therapy: Opening Upper Back, Neck & Shoulders Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Therapy: Restorative Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Therapy: Soothe Sciatica Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Therapy: Varicose Veins Yoga Lesson Plan

Yoga Pose Directory

3000+ yoga poses 

Click Here
YOGA PLANNER